Essie Davis and Thomasin McKenzie in The Justice of Bunny King

On July 29, following its world premiere at Tribeca Film Festival, DEGNZ is excited to be hosting a screening of The Justice of Bunny King, in association with Rialto Cinemas. The film follows Bunny King (Essie Davis), a mother of two who’s a rough cut diamond with a sketchy past. While battling the system to reunite with her children, a confrontation leads her to take her niece Tonyah (Thomasin McKenzie) under her wing. With the world against her and Tonyah, Bunny’s battle has just begun.

Following the screening, audiences will be joined by director Gaysorn Thavat for a Q&A session, moderated by Lucy Wigmore.

We look forward to seeing you there!

When: Thursday 29 July, 6pm
Where: Rialto Cinemas Newmarket, 167-169 Broadway, Newmarket, Auckland

Film Industry Member tickets only $12

Book now

Last updated on 30 June 2021

Making the Intangible Tangible

On July 24, esteemed documentary director Leanne Pooley will explore how a director crafts and communicates the tone of a film, a fine finish to our workshop series on tone for 2021, which seeks to pin down this elusive subject.

When you are dealing with the stories of real people and portraying them on screen, getting the tone wrong can lead to significant problems. Tone is part of everything a documentary director does when approaching a story. It’s part of the narrative, the pace, the look, the music.

Tone is part of every decision a director makes, and in this workshop, Leanne will share practically using examples from her films on how directors make these decisions.

About Leanne Pooley

A documentary filmmaker for over 25 years, Leanne has directed films all over the world and has won numerous awards (including Best Documentary at TIFF). Leanne is a New Zealand Arts Laureate, a member of The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and was named an “Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit” for Services to Documentary Filmmaking in the 2017 New Year’s Honours List.

Her work includes The Girl on the Bridge on suicide survivor and activist Jazz Thornton, We Need to Talk About A.I. for Universal Pictures and GFC, animated feature documentary 25 April and acclaimed local box office success Topp Twins: Untouchable Girls.

 

Who’s it for?

Documentary directors wanting to better understand tone – you’ll come away with useful ideas that can be applied to your own process, whether you’re directing on your first short film or moving onto longer content (e.g. a first feature documentary, a webseries).

Workshop Details

When: Saturday 24 July 2021, 9:30am – 4pm

Where: Saint Columba Centre, 40 Vermont Street, Ponsonby, Auckland 1011

Price:

DEGNZ member – Free
Non-member – $95

Lunch, tea and coffee included.

Travel Allowances

DEGNZ Full members based outside of Auckland can apply to the Guild for travel support up to the value of $250 (incl GST). We have six grants available.

To apply you must meet these criteria:

  1. You live outside of the Auckland region.
  2. You are a NZ Citizen or permanent resident.
  3. You have a confirmed place in one of the Tone workshops.

Please indicate if you wish to apply for a travel allowance when you register. For additional information and criteria, see here.

 

To Apply

Applications close: Tuesday 20 July, 3PM

  1. Submit the application form below.
  2. Email your CV or a bio with filmography to tema@deganz.co.nz. Please include links to your work.

We will then review your application and email you to confirm that you have a place. Spaces are limited and applications will be reviewed as they are received.

Application Form

 

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This initiative is brought to you with the generous support of the New Zealand Film Commission.

NZFC

Last updated on 22 June 2021

Mark Jennings, co-editor of online news platform Newsroom, and former head of News at TV3, has penned an article on Discovery’s plans for TV3.

As Jennings writes, after Discovery’s merger with WarnerMedia., TV3 is now part of the second largest media business in the world after Disney. That in itself is a serious game changer for New Zealand.

TV3 has had an up and down history, moving from private ownership into the Canadian-owned hands of media conglomerate Canwest, before shifting to private equity ownership with Ironbridge Capital and then Oaktree Capital Management. It’s financial fortunes also swung about, going from high profitability before plunging twice into receivership.

TVNZ and SKY in more recent times have kept TV3 impoverished but no longer.

Already the owner of NZ’s Choice TV and HGTV and with six of its own channels on the SKY service, Discovery has, as Jennings points out, brought its might to bear on acquisitions by driving down the prices it pays for content for TV3. With staff cutbacks and other efficiencies, AUNZ GM for Discovery Glen Kyne told Jennings that the channel will be looking to more domestic shows as it competes with TVNZ and Prime in the domestic free-to-air market for viewers.

But what kinds of shows are they after? Kyne didn’t exactly reveal what they are looking for.

In April Juliet Peterson, former GM TVNZ Digital Content, was appointed as Senior Director, Programming at Three, while Australian Darren Chau was appointed Senior Director, Production. Chau has been in New Zealand recently having meetings with some New Zealand producers. Undoubtedly, others have been banging on Juliet’s door. They are certainly looking for ideas.

With its merger with WarnerMedia, Discovery has moved from reality and factual into scripted film and TV as well, with an annual US$20 billion commissioning chest—bigger than Netflix’s. There has been speculation as to whether or not the new CEO of the combined organisation, David Zaslav, is going to adapt when it comes to scripted. This could well play out in TV3’s commissioning stance.

Supposedly, Three is looking for NZ content that can travel internationally as well. It will be interesting to see, though, whether or not the network will continue to rely primarily on NZ On Air and NZ Screen Production Grant funding to get content made in New Zealand. Hopefully, they’ll ante up more than low license fees and become equity investors in NZ shows that could go on one or more of the international distribution channels the newly-branded Warner Bros. Discovery conglomerate owns.

Will it be new beginnings for NZ’s free-to-air market or just more of the same? Watch this space.

 

Tui Ruwhiu
Executive Director

 

Last updated on 17 June 2021

As part of the Wairoa Māori Film Festival, DEGNZ Incubator alumna Hiona Henare spoke with Tia Taurere-Clearsky (DEGNZ) about her work as a prized Māori film editor, camera operator and international field journalist.

Now living in the Coast Salish Territory in British Columbia, Canada, Tia spoke about the lack of Indigenous editors in the film industry, both male and female, and how she is involved in two programmes as a mentor to hopefully change this by encouraging up and coming Indigenous editors.

Even though she is far away from home, Tia shared how thankful she is to live in a community filled with Indigenous people and how beneficial it is for both herself and her children, that even though being away from Aotearoa can be lonely, being a part of an Indigenous community makes it easier.

Watch the kōrero here:

https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2928171774064782

 

 

Last updated on 17 June 2021

This past Queen’s Birthday weekend saw the annual Wairoa Māori Film Festival take place, a festival that celebrates Māori cinema, with multiple films by DEGNZ members showcased.

Chantelle Burgoyne with Ocean and Jaimee Poipoi with Guess You were a part of the Mana Wahine Shorts programme.

Karma by Sam Li and Flip by DEGNZ Incubator alumna Jessica Grace Smith screened as part of the festival’s Midnight Madness programme. Flip was edited by Guild member Alex Boyd.

Meanwhile, Hannah Marshall’s Frankie Jean & The Morning Star, edited by Luke Haigh, played in the Aotearoa Shorts programme.

Matariki on the Move

Keep an eye out for Cian Elyse White’s Daddy’s Girl (Kōtiro), edited by Annie Collins, which will screen in local Auckland cinemas as part of the festival’s Matariki on the Move programme (June 24 – July 6). It will play alongside other short and feature-length films, including Merata Mita’s Mauri.

Kia Ora Shorts

Wairoa Māori Film Festival has also curated a list of the best Māori short films in their Kia Ora Shorts programme, screening in Auckland on July 8 – 9. Ngariki Ngatae’s Te Wao Nui, edited by Tia Taurere-Clearsky (DEGNZ), will feature alongside Frankie Jean & The Morning Star and Daddy’s Girl (Kotiro).

If you’re in Tāmaki Makaurau, check out the full programmes and where to watch them here.

Last updated on 17 June 2021