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DEGANZ released the standard feature film editing agreement last September to help strengthen the negotiating position of editors.

To give you confidence to use this template contract, we are holding free workshops with lawyer Anchali Anandanayagam of Hudson Gavin Martin. A great communicator, Anchali will break the contract down so that it is easy to understand.

Why understanding your contract is important

To get the best contract for you and to truly understand what you are legally binding yourself to when you sign, you need to learn in detail what every clause means and where the opportunities lie for negotiation.

What will the workshop cover?

  • Understanding the Guild’s standard feature film editing agreement
  • Which parts can I negotiate?
  • What do these terminologies and clauses mean?
  • The implications
  • How you can apply this knowledge
  • Q&A time

Who is it for?

DEGANZ members – open to all membership levels. We highly recommend that any member working or planning to work as a feature film editor (narrative or documentary) attend.

Attendee Preparation

Please read the DEGANZ standard film editing agreement beforehand.

Facilitator

Tui Ruwhiu, DEGANZ Executive Director

About Anchali Anandanayagam

AnchaliAnchali is a partner at Hudson Gavin Martin – a leading media, technology and IP law firm. Anchali has specialised in media, technology and IP for the last 18 years. An expert in all legal aspects of tech, media and telecommunications, Anchali often advises clients in NZ and overseas on the regulation of new and emerging technologies, data security and privacy, commercialisation of IP, and works with local and international content producers and suppliers to the media sector. Anchali’s clients in the media industry range from established media companies and production houses, VFX and post-production companies, and independent producers, directors and writers.

With qualifications from the University of Otago, Anchali gained her experience both here in New Zealand, and London. Anchali is highly recognised in the leading legal international rankings. Chambers and Partners said Anchali is not only “an experienced lawyer with amazing technical skills,” but also “a relationship builder who can deal with people at all levels both within and between organisations.” They go on to say: “There’s a real benefit having her on our side.” Anchali is a keen advocate of purpose driven organisations and sits on the board of Women in Film and Television New Zealand.

Register for a Session

Monday 9 May 2022, 6:30pm – 8:30pm
Zoom Meetings
Register now >

Tuesday 31 May 2022, 7pm – 9pm
Zoom Meetings
Register now >

 


DEGANZ received funding from Te Tumu Whakaata Taonga New Zealand Film Commission’s Screen Sector Capability Fund. The fund supports the New Zealand screen sector to develop the business and technical capability to meet the challenges of a COVID-19 and post COVID-19 environment and is part of the New Zealand Government’s Screen Sector Recovery package.

NZFC

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At the end of 2021 the Government announced a review of government investment in the screen sector. The review will be led by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment and the Ministry of Culture and Heritage. There is a document outlining the terms of reference for the review here.

This review is one part of a strategic review of the New Zealand screen industry, primarily focused on the New Zealand Film Commission’s direction and activity, including the New Zealand Screen Production Grant (NZSPG) for both domestic and international productions. However, NZ On Air’s direction and activity obviously falls into this because of the changing nature of the shifts occurring worldwide, as well as the fact that some NZ On Air funded productions utilise the NZSPG.

Our screen industry falls into two camps: domestic production, and international production (and post-production) that takes place here.

International production as we all know provides wonderful opportunities for New Zealand crew, and brings foreign investment to New Zealand. From DEGANZ’s perspective, what it does not do is bring great opportunity for New Zealand directors and editors. Only a very select few Kiwis get to direct, and sometimes edit on these international productions, being the international drama or sometimes documentary series shot here.

While we continue to push for more Kiwi directors and editors to work on these international shows, our main focus has got be on what we can do with domestic production to tell our stories here and internationally, and employ our directors and editors—and our actors, writers, producer and crews—so that they all can have thriving and sustainable careers.

Over the next three months, MBIE and MCH will be conducting a wide consultation with the NZ public and those who make up the NZ screen sector as part of the review. DEGANZ is now formulating its thoughts to bring to MBIE and MCH.

But there is an opportunity for each of our DEGANZ members to share their own thoughts in the consultation process.

When the call comes for submissions, we will inform you. Your voice counts and we want as many of you as possible to have your voices heard. This is a really opportunity for us all to have some influence on the future direction of NZ screen.

 

Tui Ruwhiu
Executive Director

DEGANZ logo

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

15 December 2021

The Directors and Editors Guild of Aotearoa New Zealand (DEGANZ) welcomes the review of the New Zealand Government’s Investment in The Screen Sector.

“The screen industry is rapidly changing,” said DEGANZ President Robyn Paterson, “so it is timely that the Government is looking to better leverage its investment in the New Zealand screen industry to improve outcomes for Aotearoa’s screen workers, businesses, and our own stories.”

In 2018 the Sapere Report, ‘Evaluating the New Zealand Screen Production Grant’, highlighted a gross additional economic benefit of $542 million directly attributable to NZSPG. This was later confirmed in a review of the Sapere Report by Infometrics.

The Infometrics evaluation also supported Sapere’s findings that the NZSPG has contributed greatly to the development of the film and television industry and all of the associated activities.

“The economic benefit of the NZSPG to New Zealand is undoubted”, added Paterson. “As is the positive impact it is having on the development of parts of the New Zealand screen industry.”

“The real opportunity with this review, however, is to determine how to make it more effective for the development of local IP including with our Te Tiriti o Waitangi obligations, the creation of New Zealand stories for the international market place, and the sustainability of Aotearoa’s creative workers. This includes prioritising New Zealand-led productions for the international market, and looking at ways in which international productions that choose to film here may be encouraged to employ and develop our local directors, editors and other creatives.”

Infometrics questioned the long-term sustainability of the New Zealand screen sector without the NZSPG, and pointed to the need for indirect benefits to accrue, such as skills development, technology transfer, tourism and cultural benefits.

“A revised NZSPG with an emphasis on developing and growing our domestic capability while protecting its attractiveness to international productions, can deliver increased economic, cultural, technical and employment benefits for New Zealand well into the future,” Paterson went on to say; “It’s important that we build a stronger, less vulnerable, and more sustainable local sector.”

ENDS

For further information contact:

Tui Ruwhiu
Executive Director, Directors and Editors Guild of Aotearoa New Zealand
tui@deganz.co.nz
021 659 950

Directors and Editors Guild of Aotearoa New Zealand

The Directors and Editors Guild of Aotearoa New Zealand is a not-for-profit Incorporated Society and Union that represents Directors, Editors and Assistant Editors in the New Zealand screen industry. This includes Directors, Editors and Assistant Editors of feature drama and documentary; television drama, documentary and factual programmes; short films; video art; animation; commercials and web content.

DEGANZ’s two primary roles are advocacy and professional development. We:

  • are dedicated to promoting excellence in the arts of directing and editing.
  • foster collegiality and unity within the screen industry.
  • promote members’ creative and economic rights.
  • work to improve industry working conditions and remuneration.
  • offer professional advice and information on contracts and industry standards and practice.
  • offer professional development events, networking opportunities, career advice, dispute resolution, mentoring, workshops, training, discounts and regular news bulletins for members across all levels of expertise, from novices to seasoned professionals.
  • are a voice for Directors, Editors and Assistants in influencing policy in the interest of our members. We do this through our membership of various pan‐industry bodies, and by making submissions to government and public officials.
  • internationally work co-operatively with other directors’ guilds.
  • belong to the International Affiliation of English‐Speaking Directors’ Organisations, Writer’s & Directors Worldwide, Alliance of Asia-Pacific Audiovisual Writers and Directors, and the International Confederation of Societies of Authors and Composers.

DEGANZ is Auckland-based with an office in Grey Lynn.

Contact Details:
Directors and Editors Guild of Aotearoa NZ
Level 2, 66 Surrey Crescent
Grey Lynn
PO Box 47294, Ponsonby
AUCKLAND
admin@deganz.co.nz
+64 9 360 2102
+64 21 659 950

The NZFC has announced the ten screen storytellers who will take part in their 2021 online mentorship programme. Congrats to board member Renae Maihi and members Pennie Hunt and Matasila Freshwater!

Renae Maihi will be mentored by writer-director Dame Gaylene Preston to further develop a feature film thriller.

Pennie Hunt will further develop a feature film drama, mentored by fellow DEGNZ member Rob Sarkies.

Matasila Freshwater will be mentored by Briar Grace-Smith to further develop a feature film crime/comedy.

Renae and Pennie are alumni of the DEGNZ Emerging Women Filmmakers Incubator, along with Catherine Bisley and Hiona Henare who have also been awarded mentorships. Matasila is a participant in the Incubator this year.

The online mentorship programme is titled Hunga Taunaki ā Rorohiko, which refers to working with others and recognising that it takes more than one person to help achieve your aspirations.

Read more

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In the late oughts, filmmaker Peter Jackson before he became ‘Sir’, and Australian film academic David Court, were asked to do a review of the New Zealand Film Commission. They delivered their report to then Minister or Arts, Culture and Heritage, Chris Finlayson. It’s 87 pages long and makes good reading. You’ll find it here.

With the arrival of the new NZFC CEO David Strong on 12 July, it’s a good time for us all to look back before he sets the direction to take the organisation forward, so I decided to pull the report out and go over it again.

The Jackson-Court Report was commissioned at a time when there was a lot of criticism about the way that the NZFC operated; very similar to the environment the organisation finds itself in today. In the opening pages of the report, the two highlight a few key areas of concern about the NZFC, with accompanying commentary. Some would say not a lot has changed:

People described an organisation out of sync with the industry it serves.
‘There’s almost an us and them attitude. It’s death to creativity.’

There is a feeling that increased creative interference results in less successful films.
‘Creative interference has expanded until now it resembles micro-management.’

A number of people described the Commission as operating like a Hollywood studio but without the accountability of a studio – ‘without anyone having their job on the line’, as one producer put it.
The staff should be empowered and accountable.

Many people felt the Commission was trying to do too much.
There was a sense that too many resources were being diverted away from the core functions and from the films that most merited the Commission’s support.

‘It would be great if people felt they could approach the Film Commission and say, ‘I’m not fitting into a box’, without there being all these schemes. I don’t want to be in a box.’
‘We need a model at the Commission that’s very open, very flexible, rather than narrow and controlling.’

‘They’re so used to being badgered, that there’s a culture of not believing, of skepticism.’

And badgered the Film Commission is; by almost everyone who gets a ‘No’, and those who think they know better.

It’s easy to bag the Film Commish and we all do it, because they commission and editorialise as well as fund, unlike NZ On Air who has the broadcaster doing a good chunk of the dirty work for them.

Writing on the impending review at the time, journalist Gordon Campbell called out industry critics in a post on his Werewolf blog:

Sure, by all means, the NZFC should listen to the existing players in the industry. But let’s hope that the review will treat some of the existing film-makers as being part of the problem, as well as being part of the solution. Because it is not only the bureaucrats who need shaking up.

How much has changed and how much has remained the same since Jackson and Court reviewed the NZFC would be a good place for David Strong to start when he takes up the job. The Report had a lot of sound advice and proposed a paradigm change that put filmmaking talent front and centre—and by this I mean writers – directors—describing an approach that was nurturing, not hindering—Exactly the role NZFC should play as we navigate an uncertain future for New Zealand film in the global market of today.

Tui Ruwhiu
Executive Director